Strider Review

Strider Review

Published On June 9, 2014 | By Steven Bourke | Reviews
Overall Score
65 %
Slice and dice fun
Beautiful paint palette
Repetetive gameplay
Short story

Remakes or even Reboots have been pretty popular as of late in the games industry; with the likes of Tomb Raider, Killer Instinct and even Thief. So with the help from Double Helix and Capcom; returns the action side scrolling platformer back from the arcade past, but has waiting for over 20 years been a wait worthwhile?

You play as Strider Hiryu and right from the start the action begins. His mission is to defeat Grandmaster Meio and his super soldiers at all costs. Right from the start you see Strider gliding down from the sky and then slashing his way through the super soldiers with a simple breeze. With this type of game comes an identity problem, you see it tries to play as a Metroid style action game; with the likes of Shadow Complex and even Super Metroid that have used this style of gameplay before and was a success. Strider tries to manipulate this with the faced paced action, but then comes the flaws with too much over the top action; repetitive combat and mini bosses all over the map, there is still things to like here and that is saying something.

The map in the game is freely open to some extent, some areas are blocked off with locked doors, and ledges that are out of reach that will need to be explored later when Strider acquires new abilities. The whole concept of this allows the player to have limited freedom to explore; allowing them to figure out where they can go to and where they cannot go to.

Somewhat due to the layout of the map, Hiryu can freely run at a brisk pace without wasting a breath of air. The player does not have much control over the protagonist; especially when running at an over the top speed, cartwheeling over the enemies and chopping them to bits. All of this sounds intriguing and fun; but it also can be quite repetitive to say the least. Whilst running, the protagonist cannot stop so quickly and can easily run off the map, and in most cases you’ll find the odd collectible or even a health boost. With all of this happening it can be time consuming if you’re the collectable type of person that wants to look into every area of the map, so this maybe the ideal game for you. This may send Hiyru on a wild goose chase to find the necessary items he needs to progress, but it is rarely needed in this action-packed game.

As you acquire upgrades to your arsenal, the game doesn’t scale-up in difficulty. What makes it worse is the inconsistent boss battles that you may have faced before, some you will easily sail through and some you will not. With this in mind the game pans out just over 4 hours to complete and i feel that it is quite short for a game of this style.

Strider may have a few flaws and tries to hide these with care, using the improved graphical pallet things do look better in Kazakh City. The neon colours of the city take a metropolis cavern to new depths, with snow-covered paths to sun-glazed roof tops; the city has never looked better.

Capcom may have brought a classic back from the arcade past and kept to the original game play, but they focused to much on the over the top action more than the actual story.

About The Author

No longer writes for Console Monster... had a good journey with the team but a new horizon awaits.