G-Force Review

G-Force Review

Published On August 11, 2009 | By David Wriglesworth | Reviews
Overall Score
65 %
Playing as a hi-tech guinea pig
Fighting household appliances
Graphics and audio are to a good standard
Possibly too generic
Game's controls aren't brilliant
-

Animals with the ability to talk are very often the main protagonists in CGI film releases. From the likes of common household pets such as cats and dogs to the wilder pets such as mammoths and pandas, talking animals is a heavily-involved concept within the generic cycle occurring in the film industry every year. However, just when you think there couldn’t possibly be anymore animals to base a full-feature film on along comes guinea pigs in Disney Pixar’s G-Force, along with a video game of the same name.

G-Force is the name of the team of guinea pigs trained by the U.S. Government to work in espionage, to put a stop to a billionaire’s plans of taking over the world using household appliances. Team G-Force consists of weapons expert, Blaster; martial arts pro, Juarez; dim-witted and always hungry, Hurley and Agent Darwin, the team leader and the player’s role throughout the game.

The role of Agent Darwin is introduced to the player via a tutorial covering almost every feature that players will encounter, from the likes of jumping and hovering, to collectibles and attacking enemies. Though it’s the game’s enemies which make the title stand out in such a poor genre. G-Force offers a very wide array of enemies in the form of killer household appliances, from the likes of toasters, irons, CD players, mobile phones, fire extinguishers, headphones, paper shredders and the list goes on. All-in-all, Agent Darwin encounters around 50 different types of enemies, each of which having its own strengths and weaknesses. This sheer amount of depth the game’s developer, Eurocom, has gone into with the game’s enemies is fantastic and breaks the traditional rules of movie-based titles of lacking in almost every department.

Like the enemies, another feature of G-Force that fails to lack is the game’s weapons, which start off fairly basic and slow. However, as players progress new and upgraded versions of current weapons can be purchased using SaberSense chips, the game’s currency, at kiosk machines positioned right the way through. SaberSense chips can be spent on the likes of maps, ammo, health replenishment and upgrades to the likes of health and weapons. However, not all weapons and upgrades are available from the off. The majority of them have to be unlocked via obtaining silver disks hidden throughout the game’s story mode, and new weapons are unlocked by collecting gold disks, appearing at the end of levels. Incorporating this great feature ensures the game is classed more of an action/adventure, than the typical movie-based title it is underneath.

As for the weapons themselves, like the enemies, they all have their strengths and weaknesses. For example: the cluster shot has an advantage of allowing multiple shots to be fired at once, however it has a disadvantage of not being particularly accurate. Nevertheless, there’s one weapon that will likely to be crushing against the household appliances more than any other, coming in the form of the Electro Whip. The whip which like any other weapon can be upgraded and proves to be a fairly vital inclusion due to its unlimited use, as there are many times players will find themselves without any ammunition in their arsenal.

However, as well as coming up against enemies Agent Darwin also has numerous puzzles to work out, mainly consisting of working out how to progress into the next room. This can be done by hitting switches to allow access to other rooms, accessing certain vents and even hacking into computers. The puzzles ensure the game isn’t a simple button-basher and encourages the player to become more involved.

Players also assume the role of Agent Mooch, a common housefly, who can access normally out-of-reach places due to his small size. Mooch also has the ability to slow down time, allowing him to pass through fans in air vents with ease. The inclusion of Agent Mooch ensures G-Force isn’t a repetitive title. Switching the gameplay every so often ensure players remain interested in the fairly long game.

Yes, you read it correctly; G-Force is quite a long title, with players likely to spend ten hours or so completing the game’s story mode. This comes as quite a surprise as in recent times, many titles have been flamed for being on the shorter side. Nevertheless, the title can be done in less than eight hours as the achievements suggest.

Achievement junkies are always on the lookout for movie-based titles, as they can very usually be done with ease and G-Force is no exception. With a high amount of GamerScore obtained from completing the story mode, as well as from collecting all the disks, G-Force is a title which players will certainly be racking up the GamerScore on.

Another common occurrence in movie-based titles is voice and G-Force is no different, with the likes of Sam Rockwell (Darwin) and Jon Favreau (Hurley) lending their voices to the game. Unfortunately there’s a few of the more well-known stars missing (such as the likes of Nicolas Cage), though the equivalent stand-in does an excellent job in their place.

Graphically G-Force rates just above average. There’s enough detail in characters and environments to meet the sufficient needs of gamers, though not enough to have them dropping their jaw to the floor in amazement. The graphical experience can be improved with G-Force’s one-of-a-kind feature: the option to play the title in 3D. The feature can be toggled on and off from the game’s start menu and works surprisingly well. Whilst it’s unlikely this kind of technology will ever catch on, it’s great to see developers going to such length to improve the gaming experience. They even bundled each title with 3D glasses, so that all players can experience this very unique feature.

Despite all its positive elements, G-Force appears to have one major flaw. This flaw is that the game appears to be too generic. There’s nothing in the game that we haven’t seen before and is one of those titles that doesn’t have the replayability factor, mainly due to a lack of multiplayer or alternate game modes.

Another slight flaw comes in the form of the game’s controls, which will take a bit of getting used to. Selecting a weapon is done with the X, Y and B buttons, though would be better suited to the D-pad. Nevertheless, the tutorial provides an adequate introduction to the controls and players will be getting paws-on with them in no time.

Overall, Disney Pixar’s G-Force is one of the better movie-to-game titles available. The way in which it has been developed and the majority of the game’s many features, make the title stand out in such a crowded genre, despite its faults. G-Force is possibly a title to rent if you find the idea of hi-tech guinea pigs destroying household appliances appealing.

About The Author

David Wriglesworth is a Northern lad with a passion for gaming, who graduated from the University of Lincoln with a BA (Hons) Journalism degree. If you can drag him away from the consoles, you can probably find him Tweeting or watching Coronation Street.